The Antropoligia Museum in Xalapa, Mexico.

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The modern architecture of the museum is characterized for its gardens of subtropical vegetation, the natural light bathing the ample exhibition rooms and hallways that slowly take us to the discovery of the Pre-Hispanic cultures of what is today the state of Veracruz.

On the southern area are the rooms dedicated to the Olmec culture. Afterwards, three rooms dedicated to the culture of the center, divided into cultural complexes. At the end there are pieces of the Huastec culture.

This Museum present the second largest collection of the Pre-Hispanic world of Mesoamerica, with about 2,500 fundamental pieces of the Olmec, Totonaca, and Huastec cultures, among other peoples from the Gulf of Mexico, as well as an very ample exhibition about the ethnography of today’s indigenous populations of the state of Veracruz.

Some of the pieces in the museum date back to the Early Pre-Classic Period from 1300 BC to 900 BC.

All of the exhibits are found by walking down a gentle slope onto a series of galaries and courtyards. The museum is wheelchair accessable and their are ramps onto each gallary. The gallaries are arranged from the oldest civilization to the most recent.

The museum host the largest collection of artifacts from Mexican Gulf Coast cultures with more than 25,000 pieces. The most notable pieces in the museum are the giant Olmec heads and the smaller Totonac ones, which are called “caritas sonrientes” (little smiling faces) in Spanish. The museum also contains a beautiful tropical garden.

I had a great time and learned so much vhile visiting this extraordinary museum.

This is a must see…

 

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